Sedona Hikes

If you plan to travel to Sedona, we have a few hikes that we highly recommend you check out.

Explore
By Adventurtunity Family
Explore Ambassador

Visiting Sedona, Ariz., had us completely in awe of our beautiful country. We happened to stay just outside of Sedona in Camp Verde for January and February. The best part about staying 20 minutes outside of Sedona was the drive into Sedona! The red rock vistas coming into view were something that never got old. From the towering red rocks to the desert hills, there was no shortage of things to do! We spent most of our time hiking and off-roading. If you plan to travel to Sedona, we have a few hikes that we highly recommend you check out.

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The Birthing Cave

Located in Sedona, this 2-mile round-trip hike will lead you to the Birthing Cave and some amazing views from within. This hike is very popular, and parking is limited to the side of the road. We suggest going very early in the morning and on a weekday, if possible. The trail is rated moderate; however, the majority of the trail is rather easy. Right before reaching the Birthing Cave, there is a rocky incline for about 1/4 mile.

 

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The Birthing Cave

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The Birthing Cave

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The Birthing Cave

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The Birthing Cave

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The Birthing Cave

Hiking Tip #1:  After visiting the Birthing Cave, hike back down the rocky 1/4-mile path and take a right off the main trail. There you will see a small path leading back up the hill. Follow this path to the top of the berm, where you’ll find a small cave dwelling. Continue up, and you will be hiking to the top of the cliff above the Birthing Cave. The views are worth the climb and literally took our breath away, as we could see across the valley on both sides for what seemed like forever!

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Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock is one of the most well-known hikes in Sedona, with nearly 360-degree views of majestic red rock. The trail is rather short at just over a mile round trip. However, once you arrive at the top, we encourage you to keep hiking beyond for additional jaw-dropping views. While the trail is on the shorter side, the difficulty is moderate to difficult. There are some slick-rock climbs and a few challenging scrambles to ascend the trail. One section in the middle is a single-track climb that is doable for most but requires some strength and agility. You’ll also need to alternate with others coming the opposite direction as it is a narrow section of the trail.

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Cathedral Rock

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Cathedral Rock

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Cathedral Rock

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Cathedral Rock

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Cathedral Rock

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Cathedral Rock

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Cathedral Rock

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Cathedral Rock

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The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

When traveling, we always recommend talking to locals about where they like to hike or visit. Most likely they will share some hidden gems with you. This is the how we learned about the 7-plus-mile round-trip hike to The Crack. It’s a locally known swimming-hole destination that starts with a wide dirt trail for about 2 miles. The next 1.5 miles start to take you up the side of a mountain. At points, you may wonder where the trail is actually leading you, but stay the course! Eventually you end up at the most serene sight, with large boulders, clear water flowing through a few little waterfalls and a natural, red rock jumping platform about 15 feet high above the pool. We were there in January right after a snow melt but couldn’t resist the opportunity to jump in! It was exhilarating and absolutely the coldest water we have ever been in to date! If you enjoy a challenge and long hikes, this one is for you.

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The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

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The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

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The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

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The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

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Devil’s Bridge

Devil’s Bridge is another heavily trafficked hike in Sedona. The trail is just under 2 miles out and back from the trailhead. Arriving early is recommended; however, this trail offers a few more parking options. There is a decent-size parking lot at the trailhead, street parking along the main road and, if you have an off-road vehicle, you can actually drive on the first part of the trail to another parking area. The hike is beautiful, with many viewpoints of red rock, cactus and, if you’re lucky, an animal or two. Once you arrive at the bridge area, don’t be surprised if you see a line. There are people patiently waiting to take their turn walking on the bridge for a photo opportunity. The red rock bridge itself is magnificent to view but so much better once you’re actually on it.

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Devil’s Bridge

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Devil’s Bridge

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Devil’s Bridge

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Devil’s Bridge

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Seven Sacred Pools

The Seven Sacred Pools hike is located in Sedona near the Soldier Pass Trail. The trickiest part of navigating this hike is the parking! The 14-spot parking lot is tucked away off a side street. You may think you are driving the wrong way, but keep going because it is in a neighborhood. There is street parking, but it is rather far from the trailhead. Other than the parking, the trail is beautiful and easy for young kids and families. We went right after a snowfall and the path was muddy. Fair warning: The red, cakey mud stains clothing, so if you go after rain or snow, wear clothes you don’t mind getting dirty … especially for the kids. We had heard the pools had been devoid of water for some time. But after the snowfall melted, we happened to catch it at the perfect time with water in the pools! It was a serene area where we saw hikers picnicking, reading and even doing a little yoga.

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Seven Sacred Pools

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Seven Sacred Pools

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Seven Sacred Pools

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Seven Sacred Pools

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Boynton Canyon

Another amazing Sedona trail that’s great for families is the Boynton Canyon Trail. In total, it is just under a 7-mile round-trip hike; however, we didn’t make it to the end. We met up with a few families and had a blast hiking this easy trail with the kids. The terrain changes throughout the trail, which was beautiful to see but also made for cooler temperatures once in the shade of the trees.

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Boynton Canyon

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Boynton Canyon

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Boynton Canyon

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Boynton Canyon

Secret tip: Look up the Keyhole — it is off the Boynton Trail but, unfortunately, we didn’t make it there. However, we certainly plan to go back and check it out!

1 / 35

The Birthing Cave

Located in Sedona, this 2-mile round-trip hike will lead you to the Birthing Cave and some amazing views from within. This hike is very popular, and parking is limited to the side of the road. We suggest going very early in the morning and on a weekday, if possible. The trail is rated moderate; however, the majority of the trail is rather easy. Right before reaching the Birthing Cave, there is a rocky incline for about 1/4 mile.

 

The Birthing Cave

The Birthing Cave

The Birthing Cave

The Birthing Cave

The Birthing Cave

Hiking Tip #1:  After visiting the Birthing Cave, hike back down the rocky 1/4-mile path and take a right off the main trail. There you will see a small path leading back up the hill. Follow this path to the top of the berm, where you’ll find a small cave dwelling. Continue up, and you will be hiking to the top of the cliff above the Birthing Cave. The views are worth the climb and literally took our breath away, as we could see across the valley on both sides for what seemed like forever!

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock is one of the most well-known hikes in Sedona, with nearly 360-degree views of majestic red rock. The trail is rather short at just over a mile round trip. However, once you arrive at the top, we encourage you to keep hiking beyond for additional jaw-dropping views. While the trail is on the shorter side, the difficulty is moderate to difficult. There are some slick-rock climbs and a few challenging scrambles to ascend the trail. One section in the middle is a single-track climb that is doable for most but requires some strength and agility. You’ll also need to alternate with others coming the opposite direction as it is a narrow section of the trail.

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

Cathedral Rock

The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

When traveling, we always recommend talking to locals about where they like to hike or visit. Most likely they will share some hidden gems with you. This is the how we learned about the 7-plus-mile round-trip hike to The Crack. It’s a locally known swimming-hole destination that starts with a wide dirt trail for about 2 miles. The next 1.5 miles start to take you up the side of a mountain. At points, you may wonder where the trail is actually leading you, but stay the course! Eventually you end up at the most serene sight, with large boulders, clear water flowing through a few little waterfalls and a natural, red rock jumping platform about 15 feet high above the pool. We were there in January right after a snow melt but couldn’t resist the opportunity to jump in! It was exhilarating and absolutely the coldest water we have ever been in to date! If you enjoy a challenge and long hikes, this one is for you.

The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

The Crack at Wet Beaver Creek

Devil’s Bridge

Devil’s Bridge is another heavily trafficked hike in Sedona. The trail is just under 2 miles out and back from the trailhead. Arriving early is recommended; however, this trail offers a few more parking options. There is a decent-size parking lot at the trailhead, street parking along the main road and, if you have an off-road vehicle, you can actually drive on the first part of the trail to another parking area. The hike is beautiful, with many viewpoints of red rock, cactus and, if you’re lucky, an animal or two. Once you arrive at the bridge area, don’t be surprised if you see a line. There are people patiently waiting to take their turn walking on the bridge for a photo opportunity. The red rock bridge itself is magnificent to view but so much better once you’re actually on it.

Devil’s Bridge

Devil’s Bridge

Devil’s Bridge

Devil’s Bridge

Seven Sacred Pools

The Seven Sacred Pools hike is located in Sedona near the Soldier Pass Trail. The trickiest part of navigating this hike is the parking! The 14-spot parking lot is tucked away off a side street. You may think you are driving the wrong way, but keep going because it is in a neighborhood. There is street parking, but it is rather far from the trailhead. Other than the parking, the trail is beautiful and easy for young kids and families. We went right after a snowfall and the path was muddy. Fair warning: The red, cakey mud stains clothing, so if you go after rain or snow, wear clothes you don’t mind getting dirty … especially for the kids. We had heard the pools had been devoid of water for some time. But after the snowfall melted, we happened to catch it at the perfect time with water in the pools! It was a serene area where we saw hikers picnicking, reading and even doing a little yoga.

Seven Sacred Pools

Seven Sacred Pools

Seven Sacred Pools

Seven Sacred Pools

Boynton Canyon

Another amazing Sedona trail that’s great for families is the Boynton Canyon Trail. In total, it is just under a 7-mile round-trip hike; however, we didn’t make it to the end. We met up with a few families and had a blast hiking this easy trail with the kids. The terrain changes throughout the trail, which was beautiful to see but also made for cooler temperatures once in the shade of the trees.

Boynton Canyon

Boynton Canyon

Boynton Canyon

Boynton Canyon

Secret tip: Look up the Keyhole — it is off the Boynton Trail but, unfortunately, we didn’t make it there. However, we certainly plan to go back and check it out!

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