Get Your Tires Dirty On These Jeep Trails

Try off-roading on these dirt roads and trails across Utah and Arizona.

Explore
By Adventurtunity Family
Explore Ambassador

When we decided to embark on this journey, we knew we’d be spending a good amount of time out West. And among all the amazing things to do in the outdoors that we were looking forward to, there was one that we had never really done: off-roading! So, we decided to trade our vehicles in for a 2017 Jeep Wrangler JK with 33-inch tires and a 3-inch lift.

The West is chock-full of off-road trails for all skill levels, and we definitely wanted to add that to our list of adventures. Between Arizona and Utah, we knew that we’d have some fun getting muddy and finding new places to explore that we otherwise wouldn’t be able to get to. We can’t wait to get to Colorado! Tip: When looking for trail information, download an off-road-specific app like onX Offroad.

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Broken Arrow Trail – Sedona, AZ

This is the trail that started it all and got us completely hooked on off-roading. Broken Arrow is a very popular trail in Sedona, with good reason. It is a challenging trail with a lot of fun obstacles and some amazing red rock views. Admittedly, this was a more challenging trail than I thought we’d do for our first time out, but I’m so glad we did. It was an absolute BLAST! We went with a friend who had some more experience, and he helped give us some pointers along the way. We learned just how capable our lightly modified Jeep is and were impressed with what all it can do.

2/16

Broken Arrow Trail – Sedona, AZ

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Broken Arrow Trail – Sedona, AZ

4/16

Red Canyon (Peek-a-Boo) Trail – Kanab, UT

Our primary goal with this trail was to hike the Peek-a-Boo slot canyon, which we had never done before. But between the trailhead and the actual slot canyon is 3.5 miles of deep sand with very little shade. Some hike it, but we drove right to the entrance of the canyon. If you’ve never driven in deep sand before, take caution. It’s a different beast, and momentum is your best friend. It was a new experience all around and a lot of fun — and the slot canyon was absolutely amazing, too.

5/16

The Barracks Trail – Kanab, UT

This trail has so much to offer, from various types of terrain to amazing views that are just as varied. For the most part, the trail was fairly easy, with only a couple of obstacles requiring some spotting. The highlight was definitely the 10-plus river crossings in the second half of the trail. The best route to take is from south to north, running from just outside Kanab to Mt. Carmel Junction.

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The Barracks Trail – Kanab, UT

7/16

Sego Canyon Trail – Thompson Springs, UT

Sego Canyon is located about 30 minutes north of Moab, Utah. It was right outside the campground we stayed at in Thompson Springs. When it’s dry, the trail is an easy dirt road to navigate. The cool thing along the way is that you will pass several spots containing petroglyphs on the canyon walls, an old deserted mining camp and a few cool rock features. The trail winds its way through the canyon and up the mountainside, leading to some pretty spectacular views at the top.

8/16

Dome Plateau Trail – Moab, UT

I mentioned earlier using a good off-road-specific app to find trail info and directions. This one is why. I used AllTrails to get info on the Dome Plateau Trail outside of Moab and it took me somewhere different, which I didn’t find out until later when I accidentally found the trailhead to the real Dome Plateau Trail. So, unfortunately, we did not get to see the caves that make the real trail an attraction. Nevertheless, the “other” Dome Plateau Trail we found was still a fun, and at times challenging, ride through the desert and up and over a high ridge.

9/16

Dome Plateau Trail – Moab, UT

10/16

Poison Spider Mesa Trail – Moab, UT

Moab is pretty much the mecca of off-roading. When we bought the Jeep, Moab became a priority on our destination list. Poison Spider is one of the most popular Jeep trails in Moab for its challenging terrain and amazing views. We were having so much fun on the trail — well, most of us were. Unfortunately, we only made it a third of the way to the top because our puppy was getting carsick with all the bouncing and bumping as we climbed over the rocky terrain. Thankfully, our Jeep came with rubber floor mats. This one is at the top of our list the next time we go to Moab.

11/16

Poison Spider Mesa Trail – Moab, UT

12/16

Tower Arch Trail – Moab, UT

After having to cut Poison Spider short, we dropped our puppy off at the RV to get settled and decided to head into Arches National Park before the sun went down. We came in from the little-used north entrance on a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) road. After entering the park, we passed a couple of signs for Tower Arch, so we decided to check it out. There are two ways to get to the arch: drive to the trailhead and hike to it, or take the Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) road right to the arch. We were still in the mood for some fun, so of course we took the OHV road! It was a lot of fun, with some challenging rock obstacles and sandy washes. We reached the arch just after sunset, which meant we had to navigate back in the dark. We don’t recommend this, but it was a new twist in our off-road adventure.

13/16

Tower Arch Trail – Moab, UT

14/16

Top of the World Trail – Moab, UT

You can’t go to Moab with a Jeep and not do this trail. We talked to several people during our stay in Moab, and all said that the view from the top of this trail was the best in southern Utah. Now having done it, we would say the same. The trail itself is rocky and challenging, with a few obstacles that require some patience and creative lines, depending on your lift and tire size. But once you reach the top and pull up on the ledge for the iconic photo, you literally feel like you’re on top of the world!

15/16

Top of the World Trail – Moab, UT

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Top of the World Trail – Moab, UT

1 / 16

Broken Arrow Trail – Sedona, AZ

This is the trail that started it all and got us completely hooked on off-roading. Broken Arrow is a very popular trail in Sedona, with good reason. It is a challenging trail with a lot of fun obstacles and some amazing red rock views. Admittedly, this was a more challenging trail than I thought we’d do for our first time out, but I’m so glad we did. It was an absolute BLAST! We went with a friend who had some more experience, and he helped give us some pointers along the way. We learned just how capable our lightly modified Jeep is and were impressed with what all it can do.

Broken Arrow Trail – Sedona, AZ

Broken Arrow Trail – Sedona, AZ

Red Canyon (Peek-a-Boo) Trail – Kanab, UT

Our primary goal with this trail was to hike the Peek-a-Boo slot canyon, which we had never done before. But between the trailhead and the actual slot canyon is 3.5 miles of deep sand with very little shade. Some hike it, but we drove right to the entrance of the canyon. If you’ve never driven in deep sand before, take caution. It’s a different beast, and momentum is your best friend. It was a new experience all around and a lot of fun — and the slot canyon was absolutely amazing, too.

The Barracks Trail – Kanab, UT

This trail has so much to offer, from various types of terrain to amazing views that are just as varied. For the most part, the trail was fairly easy, with only a couple of obstacles requiring some spotting. The highlight was definitely the 10-plus river crossings in the second half of the trail. The best route to take is from south to north, running from just outside Kanab to Mt. Carmel Junction.

The Barracks Trail – Kanab, UT

Sego Canyon Trail – Thompson Springs, UT

Sego Canyon is located about 30 minutes north of Moab, Utah. It was right outside the campground we stayed at in Thompson Springs. When it’s dry, the trail is an easy dirt road to navigate. The cool thing along the way is that you will pass several spots containing petroglyphs on the canyon walls, an old deserted mining camp and a few cool rock features. The trail winds its way through the canyon and up the mountainside, leading to some pretty spectacular views at the top.

Dome Plateau Trail – Moab, UT

I mentioned earlier using a good off-road-specific app to find trail info and directions. This one is why. I used AllTrails to get info on the Dome Plateau Trail outside of Moab and it took me somewhere different, which I didn’t find out until later when I accidentally found the trailhead to the real Dome Plateau Trail. So, unfortunately, we did not get to see the caves that make the real trail an attraction. Nevertheless, the “other” Dome Plateau Trail we found was still a fun, and at times challenging, ride through the desert and up and over a high ridge.

Dome Plateau Trail – Moab, UT

Poison Spider Mesa Trail – Moab, UT

Moab is pretty much the mecca of off-roading. When we bought the Jeep, Moab became a priority on our destination list. Poison Spider is one of the most popular Jeep trails in Moab for its challenging terrain and amazing views. We were having so much fun on the trail — well, most of us were. Unfortunately, we only made it a third of the way to the top because our puppy was getting carsick with all the bouncing and bumping as we climbed over the rocky terrain. Thankfully, our Jeep came with rubber floor mats. This one is at the top of our list the next time we go to Moab.

Poison Spider Mesa Trail – Moab, UT

Tower Arch Trail – Moab, UT

After having to cut Poison Spider short, we dropped our puppy off at the RV to get settled and decided to head into Arches National Park before the sun went down. We came in from the little-used north entrance on a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) road. After entering the park, we passed a couple of signs for Tower Arch, so we decided to check it out. There are two ways to get to the arch: drive to the trailhead and hike to it, or take the Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) road right to the arch. We were still in the mood for some fun, so of course we took the OHV road! It was a lot of fun, with some challenging rock obstacles and sandy washes. We reached the arch just after sunset, which meant we had to navigate back in the dark. We don’t recommend this, but it was a new twist in our off-road adventure.

Tower Arch Trail – Moab, UT

Top of the World Trail – Moab, UT

You can’t go to Moab with a Jeep and not do this trail. We talked to several people during our stay in Moab, and all said that the view from the top of this trail was the best in southern Utah. Now having done it, we would say the same. The trail itself is rocky and challenging, with a few obstacles that require some patience and creative lines, depending on your lift and tire size. But once you reach the top and pull up on the ledge for the iconic photo, you literally feel like you’re on top of the world!

Top of the World Trail – Moab, UT

Top of the World Trail – Moab, UT

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